disguise gx 2 servers power the longest ever AR centered broadcast

The Dubai International Cricket Stadium hosted, right before the first match of the Pakistan Super League 2019, a 60-minute opening ceremony that combined augmented reality graphics with live performance from bands such as Boney M, Junoon, Fawad Khan, Young Desi, Aima Baig and Shuja Haider.

The event management company ITW Trans Group, together with the specialist in events The Musketeers, decided to implement AR during the event with the content generated by Bild Studios and Studio One.

The PSL Opening Ceremony featured a 45-minute live show with 12 different AR scenes achieved using disguise, Notch and Stype technology. It was broadcasted live to over 50 million around the globe. The graphics included a disco scene, flying F16 jets, a 30-meter trophy, a robot that landed on stage and more.

The disguise gx 2 servers were able to render the AR content as well as the added elements. Urs Nyffenegger, creative producer, talks about the technology:  “The Notch and disguise combination was essential for the success of the PSL Opening Ceremony due to the adaptability, flexibility and unparalleled real-time workflow capabilities. Everything we were able to accomplish on this project was only possible because of disguise.”

The technology was also extremely flexible. After the main headliner for the opening ceremony pulled out the day before, the team reconfigured the content in just 24 hours, including a virtual DJ, which was easily integrated “thanks to the user-friendly features of the disguise server” according to the press release.

Scott Millar, from Bild Studios, gives us more details about the production: “With disguise we were able to composite all six cameras feeds, with camera delay, with AR, and with the graphics on top to present that composited output to the vision mixer to the camera returns, and we were able to do that for two cameras per server. This is a huge benefit over other systems. In the world of live events, with disguise, you are really able to send ‘stuff’ everywhere.”